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Full text of "Civil War men in ranks"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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http://archive.org/details/civilwarmeninranlinc_5 



Civil War 
Men in Ranks 



Last Surviving Veterans 



Excerpts from newspapers and other sources 



From the files of the 
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection 



-jt. xco'\. :. y~f2.7^ 




SHINING EXAMPLE OF GOOD PICTURE 

"Did I know Lincoln? Why, say . ." An alert amateur 
photographer won a $100 prize in last year's contest with 
this shot of a grizzled veteran recalling the days of long 
ago. The third week of the $10,000 Evening Ledger Ama- 
teur Snapshot Contest begins today. Get your share of 
the fun and 125 cash prizes 



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Only 19 Survive 
Of Four Million 
Civil War Vets 

Picture Story on Page S 

By Associated Press 

These are the old .soldiers of the 
old war. 

Once there were 4,000.000 ot I hem. 
Last year there were 4.1. Last March 
there were 26. Now there are only 
19 — a .ihrinkinp bridgehead in time. 

They .sit on I heir porche.s, smoke 
their pipe.i. nod drowsily to report- 
ers who every year around thi.s lime 
come out to the old soldiers' home or 
cabin up the road for a Memorial 
Day .story. 

Dutifully, the old .soldiers give 
their annual advice on longevity. 
Patiently, they make the long .jour- 
ney back, 'n memory to Sh.Uoh. Get- 
tysburg. Vicksbiirg— to the last time 
Americans fought Americans. 

Every year they rem.'iiiber a little 
less of the Civil War. E\ery year 
there are fewer of them to remember. 
Now, 86 years after ;\ppomaUox 
there are 12 Confederate and seven 
Union veterans left. 

The ranks of the known livins 
Confederate veterans were reduced 
Friday by the death of John Ajthur 
Marcum at his farm home near 
Danville, Ark, Marcum, at the age of 
U, was drawn into the Cunfedcrate 
Army when a Southern scout picked 
him up as a guide near Clncka- 
niauga, Ga., in Seiitember, 186.'i. A 
short time later he was sent to Gen. 
Robert E, Lee's Headquarters Com- 
pany, given a mu.sket and sent into 
battle. 

The living survivors are: 

Confederate 

Thomas Evans Riddle, 105, Texas 
Confederate Home for Men, Austin. 
Spends time playing dominoes with 
attendant, listening to war news on 
the radio or taking a slow walk 
around the yard, using a cane. 

A private in the 12th Tennes.see 
Infantry, Riddle fought under Lee at 
Gettysburg. Made an honorary 
Texas colonel 89 years later, along 
with State's two other surviving 
Confederate veterans. 

"People still argue about Gettys- 
burg," Riddle says. "Some say as 
many as 2000 were killed. But I 
know how many were killed. Thir- 
teen, that'.s,all. I was there and we 
buried every one of them right there 
in the field." 

Walter W. Williams, 103. Franklin, 
Tex. Blind, almost totally deaf, rare- 
ly leaves front porch. Lives with 
77-year-old .second wife, Ella Mae, 



Continued on Page 5, Column 1 



/9S/ 



Only 19 Livil W ar V eter ans survi ve 



Continued From First Taje 

en isolated farm quarter mile away 
from nearest neighbors. 

Williams served in Hood's Cavalry 
Brigade as forage master, or chief of 
food scrounging department, in Mis- 
sissippi. Death of first wife left him 
with seven children, three survivin'^. 
Second marriage in 1895 brought him 
12 children, nine .still alive. 

Joseph Harien (Uncle Hade) Whit- 
Bctl, 103, Bonham, Te.x. Blind, almost 
deaf and bedfast. Up till three years 
RRO enjoyed a noisy, knee-slapping 
round of checkers. 

Served 13 months in Shelby's Es- 
cort, Missouri Cavalry, but ne\er 
fir"d a shot. 

John Sailing. 104, Slant, Va. Lives 
with daughter in mountain cabin. 
Teeth gone but not sense of humor. 
Helps tend livestock. Daughter re- 
ports: 

"Course, he still likes a pretty girl. 
You ought to see the shines he cuts 
when he sees one coming up the 
road. When he gets a spoonful of 
likker in im, he's equal to a Holston 
preacher. He can preach a ser- 
mon then." 

Sailing never got a Confederate 
uniform but when the boys in gray 
came through Scott county, he join- 
ed them for a year. His job was 
digging saltpetre for gunpowder. 
Never out of Stale except lor loth 
Gettysburg anniversary. 

William D. Town.send, 105, OHa 
Jja. Walks without cane, smokes bat- 
tered pipe continuously. Ran away 
from home at 12, served with Con- 
federates at Vick.sburg, where he was 
.slightly wounded. Married his 
fourth wife 11 years ago. She's only 
60 now. 

John Greene Cliisuni, 103, Fort 
giUith, Ark. Lives with wife in aban- 
doned house at old CCC camp. Join- 
ed General Price's troops bivouacked 
near Newport, Ark., but memory of 
war IS hazy. Suffered a stroke two 
years ago. 

Reports his outfit still had plenty 
of fight left when war ended. "My 
Uncle Tom Chi.sum," he recalls, "kill- 
ed three men with a board the day 
we surrendered." 

William W. Loudermilk, 103, 
Jonesboro, Ark. At 1.6, he says, he 
joined Hood's Cavalry as waterboy, 
was promoted to sharpshooter, 
fought at Chattanooga, Nashville, 
Marietta and near Atlanta. 

He never has been able to prove 
his service record, although he cov- 
ered 1000 miles traveling through 
South trying. 

P. R. Crump, 103, Lincoln, Ala. 
Lives with grandson. Joined Con- 
f derates late in war. Recalls see- 
ing Lee ride away to surrender to 
Grant at Appomattox in 1863. 

Sight and hearing now failing. Has 
been a deacon of the Refugee Bap- 
tist Church for 73 years. 

Willia-ifl Joshua Bush, 105, Pitz- 
gernlc), Ga. Served with Company B, 
14th Oieorgia Regiment. Bush's 
Wifft, many years his junior Uhey 
were married when he was 76 1, 
teaches at a nearby school. Bush is 



all-out Democrat with keen interest 
in public affairs. 

Arnold Murray, 104, Orangeburg, 
S. C. I;ives in cabin with son on farm 
several miles out of town. 

"I volunteered when I was a 
youngster. They sent me to Sulli- 
van's Island, near Charleston. I was 
only a trainee and the war ended 
before I could ever get into the 
fight." 

William A. Lundy, 103, Laurel Hill, 
Fla. Enlisted at 16 in Coffee county, 
Ala., Home Guards. He's still active 
enough to travel to family reunions. 

George Washington Keith, 102, 
Graceville, Fla. Enlisted in home 
■^uard company in Florida in 1833. 
Remembers he wasn't captured or 
wounded. 

Union 



James A. Hard, Roche.ster, N. Y. 
Oldest of all the Civil War veterans, 
he'll be 110 on July 15. Physical 
powers failing but mind still active. 
Amazed doctors by surviving three 
attacks of pneumonia at 107. 

Still smokes cigars. Took along 20 
boxes when he flew to Indianapolis 
in 1949 for the last national encamj)- 
ment of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

Hard enlisted four days after Port 
Sumter was attacked, served in 37th 
New York Volunteer Infantry. Voted 
straight Republican ever since Lin- 
coln. 

Douglas T. Story, 106, Los An- 
geles. At 16, ran away from home 
three times to join Union Army. 
"Just had to defend St. Louis from 
ole Gen. Joe Shelby," he says. His 
father let the third enlistment stick. 

Story fought through war as priv- 
ate, i3Sth Illinois Infantry. Later, 
he worked as musician and enter- 
tainer aboard Mississippi River show 
boats, as a clock repairman and ni 
real estate. 

William Allen Magee, 104, Van 



Nuys, Calif. Joined up as drummer 
boy at 13, recalls sounding reveille 
for Sherman's troops on sweep 
through Georgia. Stayed in Army 
34 years. Fought Indians in Da- 
kotas. Retired as master sergeant 
and has since lived on pension. On 
longevity: "Never had a drink in my 
life but 1 .^moke 10 cigars a day." 

Jo.-eph riovesp, about 1G7, Pontiac. 
Mi:;h. In veterans hospical. Is the 
only surviving Negro soldier. Uncer- 
tain of exact birthdate. Escaped 
from plantation at St. Bernard 
Pari.'-h, La., to join Union Army dur- 
ing siege of Vicksburg. 

After v.'ar, worked on Mississippi 
boats and recalls he helped string 
one of the first telegraph lines be- 
tween New Orleans and Biloxi, 
Miss. Came north in 1948. 

Lansing: A. AVilcox, 105, King, Wis. 
Lives at GAR home. Broke rib in 
fall last year but recovered in time 
to be on his feet for his birthday 
last March. 

Recalls he served three years as 
corporal in 4tli Wiscon.sin Cavalry. 
Wilcox is a past national vice com- 
mander of the GAR . 

Aliicrt Woolson, liM. Diiluth. Na- 
tive of Watertown, N. Y. Enlisted as 
drummer boy. Minnesota Artillery in 
18G4. Recalls serving in Nashville- 
Atlanta campaigns. A past national 
senior vice commander of GAR. 

Israel Aaron Broadsword, 104 
Samuels, Idaho. Still walks without 
a cane and cuts firewood with a buck 
saw. A nstive of Putnam county. O., 
he joined Slst Missouri Volunteer 
Infantry at 16 and fought at Lexing- 
ton, Mo. 

Later fought tlie Sioux, battled 
grasshoppers and the drought on a 
ICansa.5 homestead and moved to 
Idaho in 1929. In 1947 was awarded 
a sei'vice medal for the Civil War — 
82 years after his discharge. 



June Fete at Elkins Estate 

To Aid Abingion Hospital 



Horse and dog shows will be the 
center of attraction at the 38th an- 
nual June Fete to be presented Sat- 
urday under 50,000 square feet of 
tents at "Justa Farm," the Hunt- 
ingdon Valley estate of Mr. and 
Mrs. George W. Elkins. 

AccoKling to Mrs. John Giibbel, 
2d, of Huntingdon Valley, general 
chairman, the day-long Fete will 
offer a carnival-like Village Pair, 
a fashion show and tea and a chil- 
dren's playground. The Pete will 
close with dancing at night. 

ONE OF LARGEST 

The Pete, one of the largest one- 
day charity events in the Philadel- 
phia area, will benefit Abington 
Memorial Hospital. Last year'.^ Fete 
reali^'.ed .So9,578, Mrs, Gribbel said. 

The dog and horse ehowa will i 



start simultaneously at 10 A. M.. 
The dog show will be sponsored by 
I he Huntingdon Valley Kennel Club 
and some 750 entries will vie for 
trophies and ribbons. The V/idener 
and Arthur L. Challenge Trophies 
will be at stake in the 20 classes of 
horsemanship. 

MAGICIANS, PONY RIDES 

Tent-covered booths will line the 
midway at the Village Fair, Gifts 
and flowers will be offered for sale 
and clairvoyants will tell fortunes. 
Magicians, a carousel, puppet show, 
calliope and pony rides will provide 
entertainment for children on the 
playground. 

The tea and fashion show will be 
presented between 3 P. M. and 5 
P. M Dr-igner fafhlons will be of- 
fered Liy Gimbels' 5th Avenue Shop. 



U '. 



1^^- VJV 



UNDAY MORNING, MAY 27, 1951 



ace A 5 




WILLIAM A. LUNDY 

(Conjederate) 



ARNOLD MURRAY 

(Conjederate) 



GEORGE W. KEITH 

(Confederc! < 



DOUGLAS T. STORY 

(Union) 



vivora. He died at his farm home near Danville, Aik. 
The olde.st of the remaininj; 19 is James A. Hard, of R' ch- 
aster, N .¥., who will be 1 10 on July 15. Death is making 



rapid inroads or, . se men who fought in the Blue or 
Giey. Last year re was 4.'5. Last March there were 
26. And now the . ks have thinned down to 19. 



THE PHILADELPHIA -INQUIRER. S 




WM. L. LOUDEKMILK 

(Confederate) 



JOSEPH H. VVHITSEIT 

(Confederate) 



JOHN A. MAKCSjM 

(Contederate) 



WALTER W. WILLIAMS 

(Confederate) 



Nineteen old soldiers, all of them 
past the century mark, are all that 
remain alive today of the 4,000,000 men who fought in 



SURVIVORS 



the historic battles of the Civil War. The thinning ranks 
were further depleted with the death Friday of John 
Arthur Marcum, who, at 97, was the "baby" of the sur- 



7 Old Merif On Lincoln^s Birthday, 
Recall the War That Ended Slavery 



By The Associated Press 
Seven Civil War veterans, a few 
of them "spry" despite their 100- 
plus years, today proudly showed 
their colors — five Confederate 
and two Union Blue — on Abra- 
ham Lincoln's birthday. 

Sole soldier survivals of the 
War between the States, the aged 
gentlemen still delight kids and 
adults alike with their recitals of 
"I was there" anecdotes about 
epic battles otherwise consigned 
to the history books. 

The oldest of the dwindling 
group is 110-year-old Walter L. 
Williams, who lives near Frank- 
lin, Tex. WUliams was a for- 
age master with Hood's Bri- 
gade. The Confederate veteran 
resides with his wife and one of 
his sons on a small farm. Frail 
but still quite active, Williams 
collects jewelry as a hobby and 
yearns to see television. 

• • • 
ALBERT WOOLSON, 106 years 

old yesterday, joined the Union 
Army as a drummer boy. He 
still tells the story of how he be- 
came top drummer of his company 
of the Minnesota Artillery — back 
in 1864 — by "knocking the block 
off" another drummer. 

Woolson lives with his son-in- 
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Kobus, in Duluth, Minn. The 
daughter says her father needs no 
special diet and rarely is visited 
by a physician. 

Says Woolson:. "It would be 

better for me if I had to work. 

1 sit here too much, I guess." 

He's up every morning at 6:30 
and shaves himself with a safety 
razor. 

• • • 

THE ONLY OTHER surviving 
Union Army veteran is James A. 
Hard of Rochester. Hard was re- 
ported "not feeling well" today. 
But 105-year-old William (Uncle 
Bill) Lundy, Florida's last surviv- 
ing Confederate veteran, was go- 
ing out for his usual daily walk 
on the holiday. - 

Lundy enjoys "good health, good 
color, and good eyesight." He re- 
sides in Laurel Hill, Fla., and has 
this to say about present rela- 
tions between the North and 
South: 

"We have fought side by side, 
Yankees and Southerners, in 
war since that time, and the 
bravery of both has written 
golden pages of gallantry in our 
history books ... I was glad 
when the (Ci^il) War ended." 
No holiday word was received 
from Confederate Veteran John 
Sailing, 105, '^ho served with the 
Virginia Infantry and now resides 
in Slant, Va. 




SHOVELS AT 106— Yesterday 
was 106th birthday of Albert 
Woolson, one of last two sur- 
viving Union Army veterans. 
Because it snowed in Duluth, 
Minn., Woolson was out, shovel 
in hand, to clean walk in 
anticipation of birthday calls. 



VALENTINE FOR VETERAN 

—Thomas E. Riddle, also 106, 
Confederate veteran of Austin, 
Tex., is "eligible bachelor" late 
in life. Riddle, who has suit 
pending against estate of late 
Samuel Riddle, has received 16 
proposals. (AP Wirephotos. 



THOMAS EVANS RmDLE, 

106, put on his Confederate tie for 
a Lincoln's birthday picture. In 
the Confederate Home for Men in 
Austin, Tex., Riddle is deaf and 
cannot read — but he still plays a 
lot of dominoes. 

Harking back to his Civil War 
days. Riddle said: 

"Five times I thought my life 
was not worth a minute. Snipers 
were shooting at me from the tops 
of trees. I didn't know I was hit. 
"But my general says to me, 
fThomas, you're full of bullets.' 
And I looked, and had been shot 
Jive times in my side." 
Riddle figured in non-holiday 
"ews this week, vnth reports that 



several women had written pro-| 
posals of marriage since his suit 
claiming a share in the estate of 
the late Samuel D. Riddle. 

The Confederate veteran 

claims he is a half-brother of 

the deceased Riddle. 
• • • 
Wn^LIAM TOWNSEND, who 
will be 107 on Apr. 12, was re- 
ported in "pretty good" condition 
by his wife, whom he married 13 
years ago. She is the fourth Mrs. 
Townsend. They live at Gila, La. 

The records show that Town- 
send enlisted in Company B, 27th 
Louisiana Infantry, on Sept. 8, 
1861. He was wounded during the 
siege of Vicksburg and was cap- 
turSd when the Confederate 
stronghold fell on July 4, 1863. 

Townsend spends most of his 
time sitting on the porch, and 
likes to listen to hymn-singing 
and preaching on the radio. ' 



7 Civil War Veterans Show Colors, 

on Lincoln's Birthday 




5 



p2 The Blue 

By The Associated Presi 

Seven Civil War veterans, a 
few of them "spry" despite their 
100-plus years, today proudly 
showed their colors — five Con- 
federate gray and two Union blue 
—on Abraham Lincoln's birth- 
day. 

Almost the only soldier sur- 
vivals of the War Between the 
States, the aged gentlemen still 
delight children and adults with 
their recitals of "I was there" 
anecdotes about epic battles. 

The second oldest of the 
dwindling group is 110-year-old 
Walter L. Williams who lives 
near Franklin, Tex. Williams was 
a forage master with Hood's 
Brigade. The Confederate veteran 
resides with his wife and one of 
his sons on a small farm. Frail 
but still quite active, Williams 
collects costume jewelry as a 
hobby and yearns to see tele- 
vision. 

Albert Woolson, 106 years old 
yesterday, joined the Union 
Army as a drummer boy. He still 
tells the story of how he became 
top drummer of his company of 
Minnesota artillery — back in 1864 
— by "knocking the block off" 
another drummer. 

Woolson lives with his son-in- 
law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Kobus, in Duluth. The 
daughter says her father needs 
no special diet and rarely is 
visited by a physician. 

He's up every morning at 6:30 
and shaves himself with a safety 
razor. 

New Yorker Ailing 

The only other surviving Union 
veteran is James A. Hard, 111, 
of Rochester, N. Y. Hard is re- 
ported "not feeling well." 

But 105-year-old William 
"Uncle Bill" Lundy, Florida's 
last surviving Confederate vet- 



eran, was going out for his usual 
daily walk on the holiday. 

Lundy enjoys "good health" 
good color and good eyesight." 
He resides in Laurel Hill and has 
this to say about present rela- 
tions between the North and 
South: 

"We haTe fought side by side, 
Yankees and Southerners, in war 
since that time, and the bravery 
of both has written golden pages 
of gallantry in our history books. 
... I was glad when the (Civil) 
War ended." 

No holiday word was received 
from Confederate veteran John 
Sailing, 105, who served with a 
Virginia infantry regiment and 
now resides in Slant, Va. 

"Full of Bullets" 

Thomas Evans Riddle, 106, put 
on his Confederate flag tie for a 
Lincoln's birthday picture. In the 
Confederate Home for Men in 
Austin, Texas, Riddle is deaf and 



cannot read — but he still plays a 
lot of dominoes. 

"But my general says to me, 
'Thomas, you're full of bullets.' 
and I looked, and had been shot 
five times in my side." i 

William Townsend, who will j 
be 107 April 12, was reported in i 
"pretty good" condition by his ^ 
wife, whom he married 13 years 
ago. She is the fourth Mrs. Town- 
send. They live at 011a, La. 

Townsend still was an "un-re- 
constructed rebel" in 1938 when 
he applied for a Confederate pen- 
sion. At that time he said: "I do 
not remember whether I took an 
oath of allegiance to the U.S. 
Government, but I do not think 
I did. If I did, it was under du- 
ress and while wounded." 




JOHN SALLING 
Of Slant, Va.; Now 105 





WILLIAM LUNDY 

Of Laurel Hill, Fla.; Now 105 



WILLIAM TOWNSEND 

Of 011a, La.; Nearlng 107 




ALBERT WOOLSON 

Duluth; Ex-Union Drummer 

Boy 106 



WALTER W. WILLIAMS 
Franklin, Tex.; Confed. Vet 110 




JA/JES A. HASI 
111, Unwell at Rochester, N. Y. 



With Malice Toward None 





yr 










ABOVE— Albert Wool- 
son, 107, last survivor of 
the Union Army. 

LEFT — John Sailing, 
106, Confederate veteran. 

KIGHT— William Allen 
Limdy, 103, another Con- 
federate veteran, who 
joined with Woolson and 
Sailing in writing a foot- 
note to the Civil Wat 89 
years after Appomattox 
— and on the birthday of 
Abraham Lincoln. 




li^^:,;;^.f^-^-/^ 



A Tribute to Lincoln's Memory on His Birthday 



CjlKJ^sij- <■<■' V'^'--'t'\ n.c^ 



Last Boy in Blue Wipes Out 
Old Hatreds of Civil War 



DULUTH, Minn.— (IP)— The hatred and animosities of four 
years of the Civil War were erased for all time Friday as the 
last survivor of the Union Army paid his respects to his old 
adversaries in gray and their lost cause. 
Two of the last four living 



Confederates, in return, sent 
him hearty congratulations 
on his 107th birthday. 

The Union veteran, Albert 
Woolson of Duluth, sent 
greetings to the Southern 
veterans as he was sur- 
rounded by weU-wishers on 
his birthday. 

"I wish you could be here 
to join me," the former drum- 
mer boy said. "God , bless 
you." 

(In Washington, the sons of 
Civil War veterans also 
buried the hatchet. For the 
first time, the Sons of Con- 
federate Veterans joined the 
Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion, their Yankee counter- 
part, in laying wreaths at the 
Lincoln Memorial. 

(Gen. Ulysses S. Grant III 
was there, and so was Presi- 
dent Eisenhower who also 
laid a wreath. Mr. Eisen- 
hower's ancestors fought with 
the Yankees.) 

* « • t 
ONE OF the surviving Con- 
federate veterans, Walter Wil- 
liams, Franklin, Tex., who is 
111, had this to say about the 
good wishes of the Union man ' 
in Duluth: 

"It was tough going then 
and they treated us terrible. 
But that is all in the past, and 
I think we should bury the 
hatchet and not think about 
it anymore. 

Williams said he felt fine. 

"If I always feel like I do I 
today I won't never die," he j 
said. 

* * * 
ANOTHER surviving Con- 
federate veteran, 107-year-old 
Thomas Evans Riddle, was 
too sick to reply. 

But William Allen Lundy, 
105, of Laurel Hill, Fla., 
said, "Sincerest congratula- 
tions and best wishes to Yan- 
kee Woolson on his 107th 
birthday. 

"I hope he will celebrate 



many more. Tell Woolson to 
take care of himself." 

Confederate veteran John 
Sailing, 106, of Slant, Va., 
said, "I'm looking forward to 
seeing him again and to shak- 
ing his hand once more." 

* if * 

SALLING, bed-ridden with 
a broken hip suffered last 
August, said he thought of 
Woolson when he looked at 
his picture on his bedroom 
wall. If they are both still 
alive. Sailing said he hoped 
the Yankee could visit him in 
Virgiriia this spring. 

Williams, who lives in a 
rural area, said recently he 
was wiUing to "let bygones be 
bygones." 

"War," he said, "never 
seems to settle anything." 
Woolson's daughter said her 
sprightly father never harbored 
any ill feeUng toward his old 
enemies. 



PAGE 20 • JANUARY 16, 1983 • PARADE MAGAZINE 



J A N UARY 16, 1983 

Si^nifica 



By Irving Wallace, David Wallechinsky and Amy Wallace 




Defenders of the Union, 1865: The Union is still paying 43 widows 

Caissons Stop, But Pensions Go Rolling Along 



Old soldiers may die , but their 
dependents don't necessari- 
ly fade away. In fact, widows 
of Civil War veterans are 
still receiving pension checks from 
the Veterans Administration. 

At this writing, there are 43 Civil 
War widows , each collecting a month- 
ly benefit of about $70. The 14 Con- 
federate ladies have received bene- 
fits only since 1958, when Congress 
forgivingly declared them eligible. 
The Civil War ended in 1865. Be- 
tween 1890, when the pension pro- 



gram was inaugurated, and 1905, 
when a cutoff was declared on eligi- 
bility, many teenaged girls married 
aging Union vets to take advantage 
of the pension. The average age of 
the 43 surviving widows is 90. 

The VA also is still paying out 
pensions to widows from the Indian 
wars, the Spanish- American War, 
and even the Boxer Rebellion and 
the Philippine Insurrection. In some 
instances, the costs of these benefits 
has surpassed the cost of the war in 
which they were earned.